Microsoft is rolling out its new Office UI to everyone

Microsoft


San Francisco, Dec 3 : In a big to elevate user experience, tech giant Microsoft is starting to roll out its new Office UI to all users this week. The visual update was originally announced earlier this year and went into testing over the period. However, now, the company is starting to roll out to all Office 365 and Office 2021 users. This new Office UI is designed to match the visual changes in Windows 11 and it includes a more rounded look to the Office ribbon bar, with some subtle tweaks to the buttons throughout Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook, reports The Verge. It is a relatively simple refresh, and Office will now match the dark or light theme that you set inside Windows, it added. The new-look can be toggled on or off using the Coming Soon megaphone icon in the top right-hand corner of Word, Excel, PowerPoint or OneNote. It should be available for all Windows 11 users right now, and Microsoft said 50 per cent of current channel subscribers will have the visual update enabled automatically. The Coming Soon feature is not available in Access, Project, Publishera-ora-Visio, the company said. Although the Coming Soon feature is available in Outlook, it cannot be used to turn the visual refresh on and off. If users turn on the visual refresh in any of the four apps mentioned above (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or OneNote), it will also be available in Outlook. /IANS




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